Securing the Right Job or Career Transition in the New Economy - part III

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eDevMan
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Securing the Right Job or Career Transition in the New Economy - part III - Sunday, April 17, 2011 2:16 PM
Part III of a 4 part discussion on the job market
In your quest for the right job or new career, haven’t you asked yourself:

“Is there a way to break from the pack and secure opportunities from the 90% of unpublished job listings?”


For the answer, consider how job counselors and outplacement firms help displaced workers to shorten their unemployment cycle. These groups of former employees are provided tools to directly target companies, create and promote a persuasive resume package and target decision-makers and hiring managers, It all adds up to positive results!

Step One: The Planning Stage


  1. Make a list of your most marketable skills and identify how your skills or job history may have contributed to a company’s financial success or productivity increase.
  2. Leverage your work history. If you have recently developed skills in an in-demand occupation, think about how you can leverage your work history to provoke discussions of employment.
  3. Put yourself in the position of a hiring manager. Think about how you can potentially change or improve the way a firm has done business.
Why is an in-demand skill so important?

If your major job skill or occupation has lost its market appeal or if there is a shrinking market for your job, the length of time it may take to secure a position with your mix of skills can be more challenging than expected! For example, if you were skilled in a technology that has become obsolete, do you have an in-demand skill? Only you can honestly answer this question. If this is your profile, then it may be time to consider a plan B, which may entail rebuilding your skill mix with more marketable, in-demand skills. With the new marketability comes the need to re-strategize your approach to connecting with hiring managers.
What if you are a recent college graduate?
If you’re a recent college graduate you may want to target companies that hire entry-level workers. Perhaps you can leverage the experiences you learned at an internship or extra-curricular activity to give you an edge in the occupation you are pursuing.

Step Two: Connect with your Resume

Now it’s time to get connected with business contacts! Create your cover [sales] letter and include a compelling yet brief discussion of how you have positively contributed to the success of a prior employer. Remember to include a brief statement that persuasively explains why you are in a job search.
Know and Stick to your Target
Should you consider resume blasting? Never! Why use an elephant gun to shoot a mosquito? Instead, do your research and send resumes only to those companies that fit your target profile. Here’s the method:
  • 1. Assemble your targeted company profile: Selectively choose companies in an industry vertical that allows you to leverage your strengths, ambitions, and passions.
  • 2. Research. Take the time to study the company’s web site and press releases. Find some key attribute about the company that you can talk about in an interview. Show a prospective employer that you have taken the time to understand key issues relating to their business.
  • 3. Seek an introduction. Find out if you know a friend, friend-of-a-friend, relative, business, civic or secular associate that works at the firm, is a trusted vendor, or a board member. In short, try to secure an inside contact.
  • 4. Kick the tires. Use financial websites to check the health of a prospective employer. Is the company in an expansion mode? That may indicate an eagerness to hire new productive talent! Are they in a hold mode? Perhaps you have a specialized know-how that may enable them to replace a vacated position.
  • 5. Polish your pitch. Always be ready to talk about how you can contribute to a company’s profits or leadership in their industry. Put together a 30-second “elevator pitch” that highlights your successes.

Direct Mailing and Emailing of Resumes


A common formula for persons in a job search is to mail and/or email 1,000 to 1,500 resume packages per $50,000 in income.A worker who once earned $100,000 or above is eager to send out 2,000 to 2,500 resume packages to rescue their career and secure a salary close to their prior level! Be prepared to make follow calls for the correspondence that you have sent out. Show job contacts that you are a serious candidate for employment.

Other factors that influence how many contacts you may need to make in order to
generate interviews and a job offer:


  • The position and occupation desired
  • Salary needs and current market conditions
  • Industry Indicators: trends that impact employment growth in your job sector
Additional factors to consider:
  • Age, sex or national origin discrimination.
  • U.S. sponsorship requirements.
  • Switching career paths or industries.
  • Past history of being downsized or fired
Anatomy of a Job Search
Consider this sample job search: To obtain 10 interview requests:
  • Send mail/emails to a 1000 job contacts. Average response rate = 1%
  • With your ten responses, success in creating three interview opportunities.
  • Work hard to convert an opportunity into an offer.
  • If the above fails, start again.
Cost of Unemployment and Mitigating Factors
[$40,000 salary example]
  • Three months out of work = $ 10,000.00.
  • Six months out of work = $ 20,000.00.
  • Nine months out of work $ 30,000.00.
  • Twelve months out of work $40,000.00.
  • Debt builds up.
  • Savings dissolve.
  • Skills may go obsolete with extended unemployment.
How can a jobseeker effectively deal with all these challenges and meet their goal of obtaining new, well-suited, well-paying employment in a timely and efficient manner? CareerWizPro can help!
<message edited by eDevMan on Sunday, April 17, 2011 2:18 PM>